Engineering Professor’s 5G Solution to Increase Data Speeds to be Published in Journal


Electrical engineering professor, Thomas Ketseoglou submitted a paper on his algorithm to “IEEE Transactions on Communications”, one of the most impactful journals in telecommunications, and was accepted for publication.
Electrical engineering professor, Thomas Ketseoglou submitted a paper on his algorithm to “IEEE Transactions on Communications”, one of the most impactful journals in telecommunications, and was accepted for publication.

The promise of 5G, the wireless standard that will soon supplant the current 4G standard, is that it will move data between 60 to 100 times faster. The 5G standard continues to be defined and concretized with ambitious goals of a wireless communication standard that envisions speeds that are practically instantaneous.

Okay, great, but how?

Trying to reach these theoretical speeds presents a series of complex problems that need simple solutions. One challenge is the quest to efficiently transmit data to multiple users. Thomas Ketseoglou, professor of electrical engineering, and UCI colleague Professor Ender Ayanoglu have solved the problem with an algorithm that’s delivered promising results in simulations. Their article on their 5G algorithm model has been accepted for publication in the journal “IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers) Transactions on Communications.”

Today, whenever someone browses the Internet on a cellular connection, they ping cellular base stations scattered throughout a city. These stations transmit, or beam, data to users within a station’s service area.

Stations serve thousands of users simultaneously and since users are often on the move, the current transmission model sends many beams of data at once, without consideration for which beams are necessary and which are redundant.

Professor Ketseoglou and Ayanoglu’s algorithm will allow base stations to send only the necessary amount of beams to a user, allowing stations to serve more users simultaneously at the same time.

“In 5G, you really need to direct your transmission to optimize your throughput,” says Ketseoglou, “With the new system, we’re not going to be so wasteful. This is the last frontier in commercial and military communications.”

Ketseoglou has caught the interest of students as well. Zachary Squier, an electrical engineering major and quarterly project design chair for the IEEE Cal Poly Pomona chapter, has worked on encoding data into a 5G signal and quantifying its effectiveness across various wireless simulations.

“Research like ours is being peer reviewed by 5G committees to determine the future of the standard,” says Squier. “If our research proves to be significant, it could influence how 5G works in implementation.”

Currently seven undergraduate students and two graduate students are working with Ketseoglou on 5G research projects. Over the years, students who worked with Ketseoglou have gone onto work for telecommunication giants like QualComm and Panasonic.