Village Phase III Saves Water, Wins Award


Village Phase III Saves Water, Wins Award
A rendering of the third phase of University Village.
Ernie Kawai, associate director of the Cal Poly Pomona Foundation, represented the foundation and University Village at an awards event Sept. 29 at Dodger Stadium.

Opening the third phase of University Village this fall not only added an extra 466 apartment-style bed spaces for Cal Poly Pomona students, but it also allowed the university to incorporate design and construction methods contributing to water conservation efforts.

While building the addition, Facilities Design & Construction suggested to the Cal Poly Pomona Foundation that the design include a unique dual flush water-saving toilet manufactured in Australia. For using the efficient toilets, the Cal Poly Pomona Foundation Inc. was recently recognized by the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California through its Save Water, Save-A-Buck rebate program.

“It is important that we make decisions that not only serve our students well but also protect our environment and sustain our valuable resources,” says Ernie Kawai, associate director of the Cal Poly Pomona Foundation. “The unique Australian-made dual flush toilets used in Village Phase III use only half the amount of water of a conventional toilet and cost less because of the Save Water, Save-a-Buck rebate program. This was an example of a win-win decision.”

The Cal Poly Pomona Foundation was among 32 Southern California businesses honored for their water-saving efforts. All the businesses combined will conserve nearly two billion gallons of water over the next 25 years. The foundation's conservation contribution is 169.2 acre feet of water. An acre foot of water is nearly 326,000 gallons, about the amount used by two families in a year.

Kawai represented the foundation and University Village at the awards event Sept. 29 at Dodger Stadium. The foundation received a trophy and certificate for its conservation efforts.

“The total savings from these 32 businesses alone represents enough water to sustain more than 11,200 Southland families for one year,” said Greg Kozykoski, project manager for Save-A-Buck program. “Every drop of conserved water is another drop that can be saved for dry times and droughts.  It is certainly more productive and possible for us to find ways to save water than it is to find new water resources,” he said.

The Save Water, Save-A-Buck program spearheads Metropolitan's efforts to promote water conservation in the commercial sector throughretrofits and installations of water-saving devices.