Learning-Centered Technology Initiative Produces First Delivery of Pilot Laptop


Learning-Centered Technology Initiative Produces First Delivery of Pilot Laptop
Alex Marzo, student assistant in I⁢, sets up a laptop computer for Psychology professor David Horner.
The university's IT Governance Committee is working to standardize classrooms so that each contains the newest in presentation and media technology and to provide faculty members with laptop computers.

As part of the IT Governance Committees Learning-Centered Technology (LCT) Initiative, the first laptop has been delivered to beta tester David T. Horner, assistant professor of Psychology & Sociology. LCT is a three-year project that will result in providing leading-edge equipment in all campus classrooms and laptops for faculty. Horner, who received a Dell Latitude 610, is one of about a dozen faculty beta testers who will help Instructional & Information Technology (I&IT) refine the installation and delivery process.

“I am excited about receiving my laptop,” says Horner. “I'm looking forward to playing around with the equipment to determine its capabilities for teaching in the classroom.”

“The folks from I&IT were very helpful in setting the laptop up,” he adds. “The process seemed to go pretty smoothly and didn't require a huge amount of time.”

The university's IT Governance Committee is made up of an executive committee and four subcommittees working on Administrative Computing; Standards and Support; Teaching, Learning and Technology; and Web Guidance. The committee is charged with creating a model for integrating cutting-edge computer and multimedia technology campus-wide.

After consulting with the members of the Academic Senate and I&IT, the IT Governance Committee decided to standardize classrooms so that each contains the newest in presentation and media technology and to provide faculty members with laptop computers to make the best use of these new, “smart” classrooms.

The first priority is to provide classrooms that do not currently have up-to-date instructional media equipment with those resources. Some classrooms already have this technology in place, some require upgrades of existing equipment and some require remodeling to house equipment. Work to upgrade and remodel classrooms will begin in summer 2005. Over a three-year period, more than 150 classrooms on campus will be remodeled and/or equipped. The enhanced classrooms will enable faculty to integrate these tools into a learning-centered instructional process.

Laptops will allow faculty to conveniently present work that they do — from detailed technical analysis to multimedia presentations — to students in the classroom setting. This is a completely voluntary program that allows faculty the choice to keep their current desktop computers or receive the new laptops, either a Dell laptop or an Apple Macintosh PowerBook.

These two new technology components of the LCT Initiative — the “smart” classrooms and faculty laptops — provide students with direct exposure to a real-world learning environment and better prepare them to join the work force. Part of a larger picture, this initiative is one of the many ways the university is working toward creating a learning-centered environment at Cal Poly Pomona.

In the next few weeks, the remaining members in the beta tester group will receive their laptops, with plans to deliver 200 laptops by the end of this Spring 2005 quarter. Additional distributions will occur in Fall 2005 and Fall 2006. The goal is to provide as many faculty with laptops as possible.

Team members in the beta rollout include Dave Drivdahl, Marcy Wright, Toni Mutz and Lori Okamoto of I&IT and Richard Leonard of the College of Letters, Arts & Social Sciences.

For more information on the laptop distribution, contact David Levin, director of I&IT Learning at (909) 979-6304 or dslevin@cpp.edu.

For more information on the LCT Initiative, visit www.cpp.edu/~ehelp/lct/index.html.