Ahimsa Center Presents Nonviolence Dialogue and Lunch


Ahimsa Center Presents Nonviolence Dialogue and Lunch
Satish Kumar will discuss “Three Dimensions of Nonviolence,” sharing insight and stories of nonviolent transformation through his own life journey.
Dwarko Sundrani will discuss how compassion serves as the foundation of nonviolence in his presentation on “Compassion, the Foundation of Ahimsa.”

The Ahimsa Center in the College of Letters, Arts & Social Sciences will present a nonviolence dialogue and lunch on Sunday, April 24, from 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., in the Bronco Student Center's Ursa Minor Room. Nonviolence experts Satish Kumar and Dwarko Sundrani will serve as featured speakers.

As part of the dialogue, Kumar will discuss “Three Dimensions of Nonviolence,” sharing insight and stories of nonviolent transformation through his own life journey. Kumar will explore the critical links between spiritual development and socio-economic development  ideas central in the life and work of Mahatma Gandhi and his spiritual successor Vinoba Bhave.

Kumar is program director at Schumacher College in Great Britain and editor of Resurgence, a magazine that publishes articles promoting creativity, ecology, spirituality and frugality. He is a trusted voice on the cutting edge of the environmental movement and a recipient of the Jamnalal Bajaj Foundation International Award for Promoting Gandhian Values in 2001. He is the author of Path Without Destination and The Buddha and the Terrorist: The Story of Angulimala.

Sundrani will discuss how compassion serves as the foundation of nonviolence in his presentation on “Compassion, the Foundation of Ahimsa.”

Born in Sindh (now Pakistan), Sundrani worked closely with Bhave. He served as head of an ashram, a religious retreat where he launched an educational program that has grown to serve 10,000 children in 167 villages in Pakistan. Two residential schools supply shelter, clothing, food, health care and education for 140 students. Each year, the ashram provides about 15,000 patients with free cataract eye operations. In 1991, Sundrani was awarded the Bajaj International Award for Humanitarian Service.

Cost to attend the discussion and lunch is $20 general admission, $15 for educators and $10 for students. Space is limited. Early registration is recommended.

For more information or to reserve a space at the event, contact professor Tara Sethia, director of the Ahimsa Center, at (909) 869-3868, by e-mail at tsethia@cpp.edu or visit www.cpp.edu/~ahimsacenter/dialogue_4-24-05.html.

Ahimsa is an eastern philosophy of revering all life and refraining from harm to any living thing. The university's Ahimsa Center is dedicated to interdisciplinary teaching and learning about nonviolence and its practical applications at various levels: personal, familial, communal, national and international.