Kyle D. Brown Named Faculty Director of Lyle Center for Regenerative Studies


Kyle D. Brown Named Faculty Director of Lyle Center for Regenerative Studies
Kyle D. Brown has been chosen Cal Poly Pomona?s new faculty director of the John T. Lyle Center for Regenerative Studies (LCRS) in the College of Environmental Design.

Kyle D. Brown has been chosen Cal Poly Pomona?s new faculty director of the John T. Lyle Center for Regenerative Studies (LCRS) in the College of Environmental Design. Brown?s appointment began June 14.

?Dr. Brown has demonstrated his intellect and his passion through his publications on environmental and social justice, and in his role as principal investigator for the Habitat 21 project,? says Karen C. Hanna, dean of the College of Environmental Design. ?We are looking forward to his leadership at the Lyle Center where he can apply his experience and many talents in a collaborative setting. We are thrilled that he has agreed to be director at the Lyle Center for Regenerative Studies.?

LCRS is an education and research facility with a resident and non-resident community of students, faculty and staff, which operates as a living laboratory within the university setting. It is designed to demonstrate ways the needs of a community can be met in a sustainable fashion while improving the environment. Students live on the 16-acre site, working with regenerative systems as part of their daily lives.

Brown came to Cal Poly Pomona in 1998 as an assistant professor in the Landscape Architecture department. In 2003, he was promoted to associate professor, and he was awarded tenure earlier this year.

Brown is currently the principal investigator for ?Habitat 21: The Lyle Center Project for Sustainable Settlements,? an interdisciplinary effort to develop, implement and evaluate sustainable settlement strategies for disenfranchised communities around the world, where people live in dangerous and unhealthy conditions. This project integrates a commitment to social justice and ecological sustainability, an integration which Brown believes is vital to the future of LCRS.

?Environmental sustainability is fundamentally a social justice issue,? he says. ?Social inequities are compounded by non-regenerative systems that often have adverse impacts on marginalized communities, due to factors such as pollution, resource consumption and environmental exploitation. The faculty and staff of the Lyle Center have the opportunity to promote a just world through their research, education and outreach related to regenerative systems that provide for long-term functioning of communities and ecosystems.?

Brown earned a doctorate in Regional Planning and a master?s in Landscape Architecture from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, and a bachelor?s degree in Landscape Architecture from the College of Architecture and Landscape Architecture at the University of Minnesota.

Among other accomplishments, Brown is the author of two books and numerous articles and conference papers. In 1998, he collaborated on a CD-ROM published by McGraw-Hill, ?Time-Saver Standards for Landscape Architecture: Landscape Construction Details,? that was awarded best new electronic product on hard media in mathematics and science by the Association of American Publishers. The CD-ROM also received a Merit Award from the American Society of Landscape Architects. The focus of his recent research has been on professional responses to social justice, and strategies for effectively integrating social consciousness into the design and planning process.

The College of Environmental Design will host a welcome reception for Brown at the beginning of the Fall Quarter.